• Little Red flying fox mum carrying her baby roosting and grooming within the camp. The little red flying fox (Pteropus scapulatus) is a species of megabat native to northern and eastern Australia. With a weight of 280–530 grams it is the smallest flying fox in mainland Australia. It has the widest range of all the species, going much further inland than the larger fruit bats. Its diet primarily consists of nectar and pollen of eucalypt blossoms, the pollination of which it is largely responsible. The little red flying fox is nomadic, and can be found in large groups of up to a million individuals. This species gives birth six months later than the other mainland flying fox species, in April and May.

Nature Images Awards 2015 – IUCN 2016 Lauréat Bourse

Paris, 20 December 2015

For his story on the Tolga Bat Hospital and the flying foxes of the Atherton Tablelands, Jürgen Freund wins the 2016 IUCN Prize or lauréat bourse in the 2015 Terre Sauvage/IUCN’s Nature Images Awards. The prize is a fellowship assignment – to shoot a photo story of his choice species identified from an IUCN’s SOS […]

  • Wildlife Under the Waves

WILDLIFE Under the Waves

With great excitement, we would like to present our latest book by New Holland Publishing – WILDLIFE Under the Waves. This book has a collection of stunning images that showcase the full diversity of marine life — from mighty whales and graceful turtles through to huge shimmering shoals of fish and riotously coloured corals, anemones, crustaceans and sponges. The book contains […]

  • Spectacled flying fox  feeding on nectar from flowers of the golden penda.

Fruit Bats!

Yogi and I have been visiting the Tolga Bat Hospital in the Atherton Tablelands, Tropical North Queensland for many many years, working and becoming fast friends with a wonderful woman named Jenny Maclean.

Jenny owns and runs the Tolga Bat Hospital. She has selflessly dedicated her entire time, home and really, her life to take care of these […]

  • Night shot of fireflies in the thousands flittering about within in a single tree (Talisay - Wild Almond).

Finalist – 50th Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Now in its 50th year, the Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition provides a global showcase of the very best nature photography. The competition is co-owned by two UK institutions that pride themselves on revealing and championing the diversity of life on Earth – the Natural History Museum and BBC Worldwide.

There is a major exhibition at the […]

  • School of blue and yellow fusiliers (Caesio teres)  eating the gossamer netting egg ribbon of a large squid in the family Thysanoteuthidae.

Life in the Great Barrier Reef

Onboard the MY Golden Shadow, the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation is circumnavigating the globe to survey some of the most remote reefs on the planet.  I recently joined their Global Reef Expedition, as a Fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers iLCP. My job was to take images as the science team surveyed […]

  • Jürgen Freund photographed by Will Robbins

Photographing Great Barrier Reef Mission of the Global Reef Expedition

In 2003, my wife and I immigrated to Far North Queensland, Australia – gateway to the Great Barrier Reef. Throughout the years, we take every opportunity to hop on a dive live-aboard or join scientific expeditions to spend as many hours underwater as possible in this great world heritage area.

Joining the Living Oceans Foundation’s Great […]

  • Laitia Tamata of WWF South Pacific and Laitia of University of South Pacific downloads year-long data from the newly retrieved data logger that shows the temperature of the Great Sea Reefs for a year.

WWF and University of South Pacific at work in the Great Sea Reef

April 2013

Our visits to the Fijian villages and the one resort in Macuata Province were made the richer when we were able to document the fieldwork of WWF South Pacific Marine Species Coordinator Laitia Tamata, WWF Labasa staff Koli Musudroka and University of South Pacific Laisiasa Cavakiqali. They were visiting 5 sites in the target reef systems in […]

  • Patricia Mallam WWF South Pacific Communications Manager chats with Kia Island village teens.

Kia – The Remote Island Paradise of the Great Sea Reef

10 – 14 April 2013

It was a long 4 hour boat ride from Nukusa Village to Labasa Town where we stayed overnight before heading to Kia Island. We armed ourselves for the next stretch of island village living, quickly shopping for a million little things like Milo, laundry detergent, more mosquito repellent, mosquito coils, junk food and […]

  • Spear fisherman hunting reef fish in none marine protected areas of the Great Sea Reefs.

Udu Point – Freediving the Great Sea Reef

7 – 9 April 2013

The first time we saw the village of Nukusa from the boat, I thought how wonderfully situated it was. It is not a beachside village like the usual but one that is about 10 metres elevated from the sea. And then on second thought, I looked at all our luggage and […]

  • Massive fish catch caught the night before by 6 men spear fishing. Fish is for community first Sunday of the month lunch after church service.

Udu Point – First Sunday at the Farthest End of the Great Sea Reef

7 April 2013

Nukusa Village is the 4th to the last village from the tip of Vanua Levu. It is so remote that the villagers need to use up to 40 gallons of fuel for their fiberglass boat to get to the town of Labasa at Fiji$13/litre, spending more than F$400 one way. So most of […]