• 10334512

Tetepare Turtles, Coconut Crabs and Seaweed Research in the Western Province of the Solomon Islands

10 – 14 July 2010

Tetepare Island

The Tetepare Descendants’ Association take their conservation work very seriously. They protect and manage the entire island most especially their 13km-long Marine Protected Area. Since 2004, they have had a dedicated roster of rangers and different marine monitoring teams from scientists to volunteers doing research in Tetepare’s different unique ecosystems from […]

  • 10334481

Tetepare Island Rangers and WWF Coral Reef Research, Western Province, Solomon Islands

10 – 14 July 2010

Tetepare Island

Tetepare is the largest uninhabited island in the South Pacific where a tiny portion of its massive land is a dedicated research field station and a cooperative ecolodge run by the Tetepare Descendants’ Association or TDA.  Many stories circulate why Tetepare Island (Tetepare meaning wild boar) has remained uninhabited for more than 150 years. One story […]

  • 10334419

Pristine Rainforest in Kolombangara, Western Province, Solomon Islands

7 – 9 July 2010

Imbu Rano Lodge

The only chance we had during this entire expedition to visit a forest was here in the Pacific. A forest, you might ask? What has that got to do with the Coral Triangle? With marine life?  Nature, from the highest forest to the deepest sea has deep links to […]

  • 10334390

Aquaculture Farming and Post Tsunami in Gizo, Solomon Islands

6 – 7 July 2010

WorldFish Center, Nusa Tupe & Gizo Airport

Onma Lodge, Kolombangara

The April 2007 earthquake and tsunami wrecked havoc to the lives of many in the Western Province of the Solomon Islands. Foreign aid and rebuilding was slow and difficult, but the people of the Western Province persevered and rebuilt their lives from scratch. […]

  • 10334367

Gizo and Ranonga After the 2007 Tsunami, Solomon Islands

6 July 2010

Gizo & Ranonga

One morning in 2 April 2007, we woke up at home in Cairns. By force of habit, even before breakfast, I turned on the computer and checked BOM, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, for the day’s weather. There was a tsunami warning button in red. Blink, blink. Huh? As we had never seen […]